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On June 5, 2019, a round table on “Sanctions and World Energy” was held at Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC). Ivan Timofeev, RIAC Director of Programs, and Adam Stulberg, Director of the Center for International Strategy, Technology, and Policy (CISTP) in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, Georgia Tech (USA), made presentations in the course of the event.

On June 5, 2019, a round table on “Sanctions and World Energy” was held at Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC). Ivan Timofeev, RIAC Director of Programs, and Adam Stulberg, Director of the Center for International Strategy, Technology, and Policy (CISTP) in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, Georgia Tech (USA), made presentations in the course of the event.

As part of the presentation, Professor Stulberg shared the results of a study on the mutual perception of the actions of the United States and Russia in the area of sanctions policy among expert and business circles, as well as the general public. He also spoke about the impact of sanctions on global value chains, in particular in the area of world energy and oil and gas industry of Russia, the EU, and the USA.

Ivan Timofeev presented the main conclusions of the new report on the policy of the so-called "secondary sanctions", their key features, the dynamics of fines for violation of the US sanctions legislation, and the possible prospects for further actions of the American regulators in this area.

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Poll conducted

  1. Korean Peninsula Crisis Has no Military Solution. How Can It Be Solved?
    Demilitarization of the region based on Russia-China "Dual Freeze" proposal  
     36 (35%)
    Restoring multilateral negotiation process without any preliminary conditions  
     27 (26%)
    While the situation benefits Kim Jong-un's and Trump's domestic agenda, there will be no solution  
     22 (21%)
    Armed conflict still cannot be avoided  
     12 (12%)
    Stonger deterrence on behalf of the U.S. through modernization of military infrastructure in the region  
     4 (4%)
    Toughening economic sanctions against North Korea  
     2 (2%)
 
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