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On October 10, 2019, just before the country's exit from the European Union announced by the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, a round table was held at RIAC to analyze the consequences of Brexit for the UK and the EU. The keynote speech “What Difference Will Brexit Make to Britain and the EU?” was made by Ian Bond, Director of the Foreign Policy Department of the London Center for European Reform. The problem of Britain’s exit from the European Union was considered from the point of view of economic and political consequences, taking into account the analysis of approaches to Brexit by political and business elites of the UK. What difficulties will the UK face in traditional economic relations with its traditional partners and how will it attract investors in conditions when it ceases to be an integrated part of the EU? How will the UK build economic relations with third countries once it leaves the free trade area?

On October 10, 2019, just before the country's exit from the European Union announced by the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, a round table was held at RIAC to analyze the consequences of Brexit for the UK and the EU. The keynote speech “What Difference Will Brexit Make to Britain and the EU?” was made by Ian Bond, Director of the Foreign Policy Department of the London Center for European Reform. The problem of Britain’s exit from the European Union was considered from the point of view of economic and political consequences, taking into account the analysis of approaches to Brexit by political and business elites of the UK. What difficulties will the UK face in traditional economic relations with its traditional partners and how will it attract investors in conditions when it ceases to be an integrated part of the EU? How will the UK build economic relations with third countries once it leaves the free trade area?

Brexit will definitely touch upon the issues of the foreign policy of the United Kingdom, that over the years of the EU’s existence has become accustomed to EU’s assistance in achieving its foreign policy goals. Great Britain is now facing several challenges: How will relations between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland develop? What will happen to the customs and border regime between the states? Will Britain strive for closer military relations with the US? How will it build relations with individual leading European states, including Germany and France? Relations with Scotland is a separate block of issues. What are Scotland's short and long term aspirations as part of the Kingdom? And what problems will Britain face with respect to independent Scotland? These and other foreign policy issues were reflected at the Ian Bond’s lecture.

Brexit also brings inevitable changes in the policy of the European Union, where the UK's contribution to the expansion of the Union and the development of a common market cannot be underestimated. Will Great Britain remain the leading economic partner of the EU or will it be considered like any other state in the world? How will the EU strengthen the domestic market in the absence of the UK? And how should the EU respond to Britain’s ever closer economic, political, and militarily relations with China?

The lecture doesn’t provide definite answers, but their outlines may appear after October 31, 2019.

The lecture was followed by a Q&A session, additions, and comments. Elena Ananyeva, Head of the Center for British Studies at the Institute of Europe of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IE RAS), moderated the discussion. The discussion was attended by experts and researchers from academic institutions, including RAS IMEMO, Institute of Europe of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of World History of the Russian Academy of Sciences, researchers, professors, and students of Moscow universities, including the Financial University under the Government of the Russian Federation, HSE, Moscow State Linguistic University, and Lomonosov Moscow State University.

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Poll conducted

  1. In your opinion, what are the US long-term goals for Russia?
    U.S. wants to establish partnership relations with Russia on condition that it meets the U.S. requirements  
     33 (31%)
    U.S. wants to deter Russia’s military and political activity  
     30 (28%)
    U.S. wants to dissolve Russia  
     24 (22%)
    U.S. wants to establish alliance relations with Russia under the US conditions to rival China  
     21 (19%)
 
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