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We have crossed over to a new nuclear era in which cyber capabilities transform the nuclear risks. A successful cyberattack on nuclear weapons or related systems—including nuclear planning systems, early warning systems, communication systems, and delivery systems, in addition to the nuclear weapons themselves — could have catastrophic consequences.

Bilateral and multilateral dialogues should identify cooperative actions and identify norms and rules of the road—for example, agreement to refrain from using cyberattacks against nuclear weapons systems—as well as confidence building and verification measures that could enhance confidence in future agreements.

The nations in the Euro-Atlantic region are confronting a range of significant issues today. But none should distract from urgently supporting and pursuing practical steps now that can reduce real and potentially catastrophic dangers associated with cyber threats.

Statement by the Euro-Atlantic Security Leadership Group (EASLG)

We have crossed over to a new nuclear era in which cyber capabilities transform the nuclear risks. A successful cyberattack on nuclear weapons or related systems—including nuclear planning systems, early warning systems, communication systems, and delivery systems, in addition to the nuclear weapons themselves — could have catastrophic consequences.

Bilateral and multilateral dialogues should identify cooperative actions and identify norms and rules of the road—for example, agreement to refrain from using cyberattacks against nuclear weapons systems—as well as confidence building and verification measures that could enhance confidence in future agreements.

The nations in the Euro-Atlantic region are confronting a range of significant issues today. But none should distract from urgently supporting and pursuing practical steps now that can reduce real and potentially catastrophic dangers associated with cyber threats.

Support for Cooperation among Governments to Address Cyber Threats to Nuclear Weapons Systems, PDF

For the past four years, Des Browne, Wolfgang Ischinger, Igor Ivanov, Sam Nunn, and their respective organizations—the European Leadership Network (ELN), the Munich Security Conference (MSC), the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC), and the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI)—have been working with former and current officials and experts from a group of Euro-Atlantic states and the European Union to test ideas and develop proposals for improving security in areas of existential common interest. The EASLG operates as an independent and informal initiative, with participants who reflect the diversity of the Euro-Atlantic region from the United States, Canada, Russia, and 15 European countries.


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