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Marlene Laruelle

Ph.D., Associate Director of and Research Professor at the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (IERES), Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University

Andrey Kortunov

Ph.D. in History, Director General of the Russian International Affairs Council, RIAC member

Central Asia stands out as a comparatively “nontoxic” region where there are limited, but not insignificant, opportunities for U.S.-Russia collaboration both bilaterally and within multilateral frameworks: in the space industry, civil security, job-creation mechanisms and rural human capital, and knowledge sharing for instance. Any proposal of U.S.-Russia cooperation in a concrete domain will have to be made in a tri- or-multipartite way with the Central Asian state(s) concerned, under its/their supervision and leadership.

The Working Group on the Future of U.S.-Russia Relations, a bilateral collective of rising experts from American and Russian institutions, announces the publication of the expert paper: “Envisioning Opportunities for U.S.-Russia Cooperation in and with Central Asia.” Coauthored by Marlene Laruelle (George Washington University) and Andrey Kortunov (Russian International Council), the paper contextualizes the bilateral relationship in Central Asia, points of friction, and potential areas for cooperation amid an extremely tense relationship between Washington and Moscow.

Central Asia stands out as a comparatively “nontoxic” region where there are limited, but not insignificant, opportunities for U.S.-Russia collaboration both bilaterally and within multilateral frameworks: in the space industry, civil security, job-creation mechanisms and rural human capital, and knowledge sharing for instance. Any proposal of U.S.-Russia cooperation in a concrete domain will have to be made in a tri- or-multipartite way with the Central Asian state(s) concerned, under its/their supervision and leadership.

The Working Group on the Future of U.S.-Russia Relations, a bilateral collective of rising experts from American and Russian institutions, announces the publication of the expert paper: “Envisioning Opportunities for U.S.-Russia Cooperation in and with Central Asia.” Coauthored by Marlene Laruelle (George Washington University) and Andrey Kortunov (Russian International Affairs Council), the paper contextualizes the bilateral relationship in Central Asia, points of friction, and potential areas for cooperation amid an extremely tense relationship between Washington and Moscow.

Envisioning Opportunities for U.S.-Russia Cooperation in and with Central Asia, 0.9 Mb


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