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Andrey Kortunov

Ph.D. in History, Director General of the Russian International Affairs Council, RIAC member

Sarah Lain

Research Fellow in International Security Studies at RUSI

Malcolm Chalmers

Deputy Director-General of the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI)

Maria Smekalova

PhD Candidate, Institute for U.S. and Canadian Studies, RAS, RIAC Expert

This report represents findings from the second round of the UK–Russia Track II bilateral security dialogue, held by RUSI in collaboration with the Moscow-based Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC).

The dialogue, held between April and December 2017, brought together experts and former government officials from the two countries to discuss and debate ways in which the UK and Russia’s
bilateral security relationship can be better managed.

Initially conceived during a moment in relations when the United Kingdom and the Russian Federation appeared to be on a modestly upward trajectory, relations between the two countries worsened in March 2018 due to the poisoning with a nerve agent of Sergei Skripal and his daughter. The UK has laid the blame for the event on Moscow, and measures have been taken by both governments against each other.

Our discussions were completed before these events, and therefore did not take them into account. Nevertheless, the project context remains strong, and the case for continuing dialogue between non-governmental experts is even stronger now that official relations between our two countries are tense and opportunities for dialogue at official level are becoming more limited.

This report represents findings from the second round of the UK–Russia Track II bilateral security dialogue, held by Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies (RUSI) in collaboration with the Moscow-based Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC).

The dialogue, held between April and December 2017, brought together experts and former government officials from the two countries to discuss and debate ways in which the UK and Russia’s bilateral security relationship can be better managed.

Initially conceived during a moment in relations when the United Kingdom and the Russian Federation appeared to be on a modestly upward trajectory, relations between the two countries worsened in March 2018 due to the poisoning with a nerve agent of Sergei Skripal and his daughter. The UK has laid the blame for the event on Moscow, and measures have been taken by both governments against each other.

Our discussions were completed before these events, and therefore did not take them into account. Nevertheless, the project context remains strong, and the case for continuing dialogue between non-governmental experts is even stronger now that official relations between our two countries are tense and opportunities for dialogue at official level are becoming more limited.

Defining Dialogue: How to Manage Russia–UK Security Relations. Part 2. RIAC and RUSI Report, 3 Mb

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Poll conducted

  1. Korean Peninsula Crisis Has no Military Solution. How Can It Be Solved?
    Demilitarization of the region based on Russia-China "Dual Freeze" proposal  
     36 (35%)
    Restoring multilateral negotiation process without any preliminary conditions  
     27 (26%)
    While the situation benefits Kim Jong-un's and Trump's domestic agenda, there will be no solution  
     22 (21%)
    Armed conflict still cannot be avoided  
     12 (12%)
    Stonger deterrence on behalf of the U.S. through modernization of military infrastructure in the region  
     4 (4%)
    Toughening economic sanctions against North Korea  
     2 (2%)
 
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