Print Читать на русском
Rate this article
(votes: 3, rating: 5)
 (3 votes)
Share this article
Sergey Luzyanin

Director of RAS Institute for Far Eastern Studies, RIAC member

Zhao Huasheng

Professor and director of the Center for Russia and Central Asia Studies, Fudan University, Shanghai

This report presents the results of analysis of the state of Russia–China relations in 2016 and the first quarter of 2017. Leading Russian and Chinese experts study major Russia’s and China’s interests and prospects for cooperation on the international arena, key areas and ways of expanding trade, economy and investment ties between the two states, assess the dynamics of militarytechnical collaboration and priorities of cooperation in culture, science, education and mass media between the two states, and set forth recommendations for promoting Russia – China interaction.
Particular attention is given to multilateral collaboration in Eurasia.

RIAC, Institute of Far Eastern Studies RAS and Fudan University Report.

This report presents the results of analysis of the state of Russia–China relations in 2016 and the first quarter of 2017. Leading Russian and Chinese experts study major Russia’s and China’s interests and prospects for cooperation on the international arena, key areas and ways of expanding trade, economy and investment ties between the two states, assess the dynamics of militarytechnical collaboration and priorities of cooperation in culture, science, education and mass media between the two states, and set forth recommendations for promoting Russia – China interaction.
Particular attention is given to multilateral collaboration in Eurasia.

Authors

From Russia:

S.G. Luzyanin, Dr. of History (Head); A.V. Kortunov, Ph.D. in History; A.N. Karneev, Ph.D. in History; V.E. Petrovsky, Dr. of Political Science; V.B. Kashin, Ph.D. in Political Science; I.E. Denisov; R.A. Epikhina; Y.V. Kulintsev; L.V. Filippova.

From China:

Zhao Huasheng, Professor (Head); Wu Xinbo, Professor, Ph.D. in International Relations; Liu Huaqin, Ph.D. in Economics; Shi Ze, Professor; Shi Zhiqin, Professor, Ph.D. in International Relations; Xing Guangcheng, Dr. of Law; Feng Yujun, Dr. of Law; Cai Cuihong, Professor, Ph.D. in International Relations; Ma Bin, Ph.D. in International Relations.

Copy Editors:

I.N. Timofeev, Ph.D. in Political Science; T.A. Makhmutov, Ph.D. in Political Science; L.V. Filippova

Russian–Chinese Dialogue: The 2017 Model, 1.2 Mb

Rate this article
(votes: 3, rating: 5)
 (3 votes)
Share this article

Poll conducted

  1. Korean Peninsula Crisis Has no Military Solution. How Can It Be Solved?
    Demilitarization of the region based on Russia-China "Dual Freeze" proposal  
     36 (35%)
    Restoring multilateral negotiation process without any preliminary conditions  
     27 (26%)
    While the situation benefits Kim Jong-un's and Trump's domestic agenda, there will be no solution  
     22 (21%)
    Armed conflict still cannot be avoided  
     12 (12%)
    Stonger deterrence on behalf of the U.S. through modernization of military infrastructure in the region  
     4 (4%)
    Toughening economic sanctions against North Korea  
     2 (2%)
 
For business
For researchers
For students