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Over the course of the last two years, security risks across Asia have been on the rise. The region’s future is marred with uncertainty that is rooted in the revival of great power competition, and trade wars. The Carnegie Moscow Center and the Russian International Affairs Council organized a discussion about the future of the region.

Over the course of the last two years, security risks across Asia have been on the rise. The region’s future is marred with uncertainty that is rooted in the revival of great power competition, trade wars, and the unpredictable policies of U.S. President Donald Trump. Different powers each promote their visions for this vast region. The U.S., together with its Asian allies and partners, is advocating for a free and open Indo-Pacific. China is pushing its mammoth Belt and Road Initiative, while Russia is promoting a Partnership for Greater Eurasia.

  • What do these competing visions represent?
  • Are they driven by strategic calculations in key capitals, or are they merely the products of domestic powerplays among various bureaucracies?
  • Is the American vision of the Indo-Pacific a threat for Russia and China?
  • And is a multilateral security framework in Asia that will uphold peace feasible?

These and other questions were discussed by a panel of leading scholars from Russia, the U.S., India, Japan, and South Korea. The event was organized by the Carnegie Moscow Center and the Russian International Affairs Council.

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Poll conducted

  1. Korean Peninsula Crisis Has no Military Solution. How Can It Be Solved?
    Demilitarization of the region based on Russia-China "Dual Freeze" proposal  
     36 (35%)
    Restoring multilateral negotiation process without any preliminary conditions  
     27 (26%)
    While the situation benefits Kim Jong-un's and Trump's domestic agenda, there will be no solution  
     22 (21%)
    Armed conflict still cannot be avoided  
     12 (12%)
    Stonger deterrence on behalf of the U.S. through modernization of military infrastructure in the region  
     4 (4%)
    Toughening economic sanctions against North Korea  
     2 (2%)
 
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