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July 20–22, 2018, Berlin hosted the fifth meeting of the “Middle East Dialogue” group organized by the Washington Middle East Institute in partnership with Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies at the U.S. Ministry of Defense.

Dialogue meetings are held regularly twice a year from July 2016. The aim of the U.S.-Russia Middle East Dialogue group is to exchange unofficial opinions on the situation in the region, identify coinciding and divergent interests of the United States and Russia in the Middle East, assess the possible dynamics of regional conflicts, and elaborate specific proposals on the Middle East issues for the administration offices of Russia and the U.S.

The dialog group brings together a core group of American and Russian experts in the regional studies, who represent different research centers of the two countries.

On July 20–22, 2018, Berlin hosted the fifth meeting of the “Middle East Dialogue” group organized by the Washington Middle East Institute in partnership with Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies at the U.S. Ministry of Defense.

Dialogue meetings are held regularly twice a year from July 2016. The aim of the U.S.-Russia Middle East Dialogue group is to exchange unofficial opinions on the situation in the region, identify coinciding and divergent interests of the United States and Russia in the Middle East, assess the possible dynamics of regional conflicts, and elaborate specific proposals on the Middle East issues for the administration offices of Russia and the U.S.

The dialog group brings together a core group of American and Russian experts in the regional studies, who represent different research centers of the two countries.

Aleksandr Aksenyonok, RIAC Vice-President; Andrey Kortunov, RIAC Director General; Irina Zvyagelskaya, RIAC expert, Senior Researcher of RAS Institute for Oriental Studies; Nikolai Kozhanov, RIAC expert, Academy Fellow with the Chatham House Russia and Eurasia Program; Elena Suponina, RIAC expert, Advisor to Director of Russian Institute for Strategic Studies; and Ivan Safranchuk, Associate Professor, Department of Political Process, MGIMO University; attended the meeting gin Berlin.

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  1. Korean Peninsula Crisis Has no Military Solution. How Can It Be Solved?
    Demilitarization of the region based on Russia-China "Dual Freeze" proposal  
     36 (35%)
    Restoring multilateral negotiation process without any preliminary conditions  
     27 (26%)
    While the situation benefits Kim Jong-un's and Trump's domestic agenda, there will be no solution  
     22 (21%)
    Armed conflict still cannot be avoided  
     12 (12%)
    Stonger deterrence on behalf of the U.S. through modernization of military infrastructure in the region  
     4 (4%)
    Toughening economic sanctions against North Korea  
     2 (2%)
 
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