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On September 13, 2017, the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC) held a round table "Russia — Japan — U.S. Relations in the Asia-Pacific".

Ivan Timofeev, Director of Programs, Member of RIAC, delivered welcoming remarks at the event.

Satoru Mori, Professor at Hosei University, Ryo Sahashi, Professor at Kanagawa University, and Masafumi Iida, Senior Research Fellow at the National Institute for Defense Studies (Japan), delivered key speeches at the round table.

On September 13, 2017, the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC) held a round table "Russia — Japan — U.S. Relations in the Asia-Pacific".

Ivan Timofeev, Director of Programs, Member of RIAC, delivered welcoming remarks at the event.

Satoru Mori, Professor at Hosei University, Ryo Sahashi, Professor at Kanagawa University, and Masafumi Iida, Senior Research Fellow at the National Institute for Defense Studies (Japan), delivered key speeches at the round table.

Gleb Ivashentsov, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Russia, Member of RIAC, Dmitry Streltsov, Head of the Department of Oriental Studies at MGIMO University, Alexander Fedorovsky, Head of the Sector of the Asia-Pacific Region Problems, Leading Research Fellow at the Center for Asia Pacific Studies of the Institute of World Economy and International Relations of RAS, Evgeny Kanaev, Head of the Asia-Pacific Division at the Center for Comprehensive European and International Studies (CCEIS) at Higher School of Economics, and Ilya Kravchenko, Member of the International Political Science Association (IPSA), were among Russian participants of the event.

Following the Japanese experts' speeches participants discussed Russia's and Japan's views on security architecture and strategic cooperation in the Asia Pacific, U.S.-Japan relations and their positions on cooperation with the other Asia Pacific actors, mostly China, as well as approaches towards North Korean crisis.

Ivan Timofeev summarized the discussion. Participants took not of the fruitful discussion and reiterated their support for the dialogue.

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Poll conducted

  1. Korean Peninsula Crisis Has no Military Solution. How Can It Be Solved?
    Demilitarization of the region based on Russia-China "Dual Freeze" proposal  
     36 (35%)
    Restoring multilateral negotiation process without any preliminary conditions  
     27 (26%)
    While the situation benefits Kim Jong-un's and Trump's domestic agenda, there will be no solution  
     22 (21%)
    Armed conflict still cannot be avoided  
     12 (12%)
    Stonger deterrence on behalf of the U.S. through modernization of military infrastructure in the region  
     4 (4%)
    Toughening economic sanctions against North Korea  
     2 (2%)
 
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