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On March 14­–15, the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC) and the National Committee on American Foreign Policy (NCAFP) host a U.S.–Japan–Russia Trilateral Conference in New York. This is the third event in a series that is to result in a joint trilateral report by the end 2018.

The Conference focuses on the future of Northeast Asia and the challenges and opportunities it faces. Much of the discussion is devoted to Russia's and U.S. stances towards the region and the impact their bilateral ties have on cooperation with countries of the region and ensuring their stability.

On March 14­–15, the Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC) and the National Committee on American Foreign Policy (NCAFP) host a U.S.–Japan–Russia Trilateral Conference in New York. This is the third event in a series that is to result in a joint trilateral report by the end 2018.

The Conference focuses on the future of Northeast Asia and the challenges and opportunities it faces. Much of the discussion is devoted to Russia's and U.S. stances towards the region and the impact their bilateral ties have on cooperation with countries of the region and ensuring their stability.

The event was opened by Rosemary DiCarlo, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. Leading U.S. and Japanese scholars on foreign policy issues, including Thomas Graham (Kissinger Associates, Inc.), Sheila Smith (Council of Foreign Relations), Nobuo Shimotomai (Hosei University), and Daisuke Abiru (Japan Bank for International Cooperation) spoke at the meeting. A special address was delivered by Daniel Russel, the Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 2013 to 2017.

The RIAC is represented by its Vice-President Gleb Ivashentsov, the Director of Programs Ivan Timofeev, RIAC expert Dmitry Streltsov, and Maria Smekalova, Coordinator of Cybersecurity Programs.

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Poll conducted

  1. Korean Peninsula Crisis Has no Military Solution. How Can It Be Solved?
    Demilitarization of the region based on Russia-China "Dual Freeze" proposal  
     36 (35%)
    Restoring multilateral negotiation process without any preliminary conditions  
     27 (26%)
    While the situation benefits Kim Jong-un's and Trump's domestic agenda, there will be no solution  
     22 (21%)
    Armed conflict still cannot be avoided  
     12 (12%)
    Stonger deterrence on behalf of the U.S. through modernization of military infrastructure in the region  
     4 (4%)
    Toughening economic sanctions against North Korea  
     2 (2%)
 
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