Dmitri Trenin

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Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center.

Graduated from the Military Institute (now Military University) in Moscow. Holds a Ph.D. degree in History.

Served in the Soviet and Russian army. Liaison officer in the external relations branch of the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany (Potsdam). Senior lecturer at the Military Institute. Member of the delegation at the Geneva talks on nuclear and space weapons. Senior research fellow at the NATO Defense College and fellow at the Institute of Europe of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Head of the scientific council, lead researcher and chairman of the Foreign and Security Policy program of the Carnegie Moscow Center.

Since 2008, Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center.

Author of over 10 books published in Russia, the USA, Germany, China and other countries.

Academic focus: transatlantic and Eurasian security, international relations, Russian foreign policy, geopolitics and globalization, and post-soviet Eurasia.

Analytical articles

 

Member Comments

182
18 September 2015
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Like It or Not, America and Russia Need to Cooperate in Syria
304
18 June 2015
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Harsh Realities in Ukraine
231
13 February 2015
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

The Disturbing Legacy of the Ukraine Crisis
176
29 August 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Russia’s New National Strategy
175
19 August 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

The Russian Convoy
180
12 August 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Silence in the Air on Eastern Ukraine
139
28 July 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

MH17, part of larger Ukraine crisis, likely to be politicized
207
21 July 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Ukraine and the aftermath of the downing of flight MH17
752
18 July 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Malaysia and Ukraine
161
3 July 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

U.S.-Russian Diplomatic Normalcy: One Small Step Nearer?
145
29 May 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Get Ready World: The U.S.-Russian Rivalry Is Back
201
21 May 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Russia and China: The Russian Liberals’ Revenge
186
6 May 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Ukraine Burning
172
11 April 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Transnistria: A Gathering Storm
736
8 April 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Five Issues at Stake in the Arctic
283
31 March 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Russia: Pivoting to Asia or Just to China?
143
28 February 2014
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Keep a Lid on Crimea
222
22 November 2013
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

A New Russia Policy for Germany
149
3 October 2013
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Russia Is Defending Its Own Interests With Its Stance on Syria
185
13 September 2013
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

The West Just Doesn’t Get Putin
183
2 July 2013
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Vladimir Putin’s Fourth Vector
181
12 February 2013
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

The Mythical Alliance: Russia’s Syria Policy
266
29 January 2013
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

Revising the concept of Eurasia
163
28 January 2013
Dmitri Trenin

Director of the Carnegie Moscow Center

The End of the EU-Russia Relationship As You Know It

Poll conducted

  1. Korean Peninsula Crisis Has no Military Solution. How Can It Be Solved?
    Demilitarization of the region based on Russia-China "Dual Freeze" proposal  
     36 (35%)
    Restoring multilateral negotiation process without any preliminary conditions  
     27 (26%)
    While the situation benefits Kim Jong-un's and Trump's domestic agenda, there will be no solution  
     22 (21%)
    Armed conflict still cannot be avoided  
     12 (12%)
    Stonger deterrence on behalf of the U.S. through modernization of military infrastructure in the region  
     4 (4%)
    Toughening economic sanctions against North Korea  
     2 (2%)
 
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